SafetyLitigation.com
content top

Fifth Circuit Finds Two “Occurrences” In Rejecting Rig Owner’s Insurance Claim

On Tuesday, the Fifth Circuit affirmed a judgment for the insurers of a drilling rig that rejected a claim from the rig owner for approximately $17 million in losses.  Following a storm in February 2010, a jack-up drilling rig encountered severe weather and the rough seas caused the rig’s legs to become misaligned, which added to the rig’s difficulties caused by twenty...

2015 Year in Review

Earlier today, we released the 2015 Year in Review, which assembles the 20 posts from last year that received the most reader interest.

Supreme Court Asked To Clear Up Maritime Contracting Circuit Split

An ocean carrier and its on-land rail subcontractor have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve the uncertainty in maritime contracting created by an apparent conflict between the Seventh Circuit and a recent Second Circuit decision that arise from the interpretation of the U.S. Supreme Court’s case of Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Ltd. v. Regal-Beloit, 561 U.S. 89 (2010), a case that...

Work Product Protection Does Not Extend To Claims Investigator’s Report In Admiralty Case

Company A chartered a barge to Company B as a platform for A/C generation and refrigeration of fish products.  In the summer of 2011, the President of Company A wrote to Company B requesting that it examine the barge for potential electrolysis given fears that the barge had developed a starboard list.  Company B responded that it did not have responsibility or the time to inspect...

Recent Decision Raises Many Questions About Privilege Of Internal Investigations

Before your company launches its next internal investigation, it would be wise to consider a recent opinion from a federal magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, which if stands, elevates the bar for making sure that the documents created in an internal investigation can be protected from discovery in litigation.  The court, applying federal...

Bypassing Pollution Control Devices Costly For Shipowner Following Coast Guard Sanctions

In 2010, the U.S. Coast Guard inspected a Norwegian-flagged oceangoing tank vessel while it was docked in Corpus Christi, Texas.  Based on inspections, witness statements, and evidence collected from the vessel, the U.S. Coast Guard concluded that the ship’s pollution control devices were inoperable or had been disarmed and that the ship failed to comply with her own Safety...

« Older Entries